Location

Primary Location

10 West Loop Road

Wheaton, IL 60189 US

630-665-6161

630-665-6324

Monday:

7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday:

7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Friday:

7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Saturday:

7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Surgical Services

We perform a wide variety of surgical procedures and take great pride in our ability to provide your pet with a safe surgical experience. Using the most up to date technology, our veterinarians perform not only spays and neuters, but are also skilled at performing cystotomies (removal of bladder stones), foreign body removals, growth removals, eye and ear surgeries and more. Our surgical laser is used to speed healing. We include nail trims with every surgery.

We are committed to educating our clients about the importance of routine dental care for all our patients. We have a fully equipped, dental surgical suite in our hospital in addition to our main surgical area. Our dental services include routine teeth cleaning and polishing, digital dental X-rays, tooth extractions and minor oral surgery.

canine dog dental

The following information will help you prepare for your pet's surgery. In the meantime, please don't hesitate to call us with any questions.

What Do I Need to Do To Prepare My Pet For Before Surgery?

For the safety of your pet, other hospitalized animals, and our staff, all animals that come in for surgery are required to be current on vaccines and have had a stool check. Required vaccines, at least 7 days prior to surgery, include distemper, rabies, and Bordetella for dogs. Dogs must also have a negative heartworm test before being anesthetized. Cats must be current on distemper and rabies at least 7 days prior to surgery.

When Should My Pet be Fasted?

We ask that dogs and cats have their food withheld after 10pm the evening before surgery. Water can be provided right up until your pet arrives. Rabbits and other exotic animals should be fed right up until the time of their arrival, and fresh food should accompany them for their visit, so we can resume feeding them as soon as they are awake

What Time Should I Arrive with My Pet?

Scheduled surgical procedures are performed Monday through Friday. Unless directed by the surgeon, please arrive for your surgical appointment between 7:00 and 7:45am. The surgeon or surgical technician will check you in, provide a written estimate for the procedure, and answer any questions or concerns you have about the procedure. Please allow 10-20 minutes for this check in process. The surgeon generally has 3-5 surgeries scheduled daily. He or she sets the order of procedures after all patients have arrived. The surgeon weighs the health status of the patient, the procedure to be performed, and the pet’s stress level when determining the order in which procedures take place. Regardless of surgical order, we aim to complete all scheduled surgeries by no later than 4pm, to ensure each pet can recover and be home before the end of the day.    

Why Does My Pet Have to Arrive Early if They Aren’t Going First?

The surgery day is a long day for everyone. We know that pets are less comfortable in the hospital than they are at home. However, an early arrival for all patients ensures that the surgical team (one doctor and one technician) is available for pre-operative discussions. It also allows the surgeon to properly assess the best order for their procedures, and more seamlessly adjust if any procedure has to be cancelled.    

What is the Surgery Day Like for My Pet?

Upon arrival, all patients get a full physical exam performed by the surgeon. This exam helps identify abnormalities such as heart murmurs, fever, etc., that may increase risk of anesthetic complications. The exam also helps us assess a patient’s stress level to determine if special steps are needed to get the pet through their day. Next, a blood panel is drawn (except for exotic species). Even apparently healthy animals can have serious organ system problems that could cause anesthetic or surgical complications so the blood panel helps indentify internal problems that may result in postponement of the procedure or the use of special measures to help a pet through the surgery

If the exam and blood panel indicate that surgery is appropriate, your pet will receive pre-medications to help prevent pain, manage nausea, and remain calmer throughout their stay. These medicines allow us to use lesser amounts of anesthesia, and they provide comfort to your pet for pre-operative procedures such as catheter placement.

IV fluids are given during the surgery. We shave a small spot on the front leg for the placement of the catheter. IV fluids help keep your pet's blood pressure normal throughout the procedure. An IV catheter already in place is also extremely beneficial should your pet experience an anesthetic emergency which would require immediate intravenous medication.

For animals who go to surgery later in the day, our staff makes sure they are as comfortable as they can be during their stay. Dogs are walked every few hours, and we utilize calming music, pheromones, and human interaction to help all our patients remain calm while they wait. If necessary, we administer additional anxiety reducing medicines as well.  

In general, the surgeon will only contact you post-operatively. At this time, they will go through release and recovery information and give an estimated release time. The surgeon may contact you pre-operatively if they experienced an unexpected delay, if they have questions for you, or if they found concerns on their exam or blood panel.

Clients are encouraged to contact the hospital at any time to receive updates on their pets. We know it is a long and stressful day for you, too! We ask for patience as we navigate through the day, and we promise that we will always treat your pets with the same level of love and attention that we would provide our own animals.

Is There Anything I Can Do to Help My High Stress Pet Have a Better Surgery Day?

We strive to limit stress in all of our patients, but we know that some pets are extremely anxious in the hospital. This should never be a barrier that prevents us from providing necessary care. Proactive planning and a partnership between clients and the surgeon can help even the most stressed pets have a good surgical experience. We encourage clients whose dogs and cats experience high levels of stress to contact us in advance of their surgery day to discuss pre-visit anxiety medicines, and special planning that we can utilize to make their day more peaceful.  

How Is The Safety of My Animal Maintained During Anesthesia?

Today's modern anesthetic monitors have made surgery much safer than in the past. We take every precaution to ensure your pet will have a safe anesthetic experience. We adjust the amount and type of anesthetic used depending on the health of your pet. A highly trained veterinary technician or veterinary assistant is with our doctors for every surgery and every dental procedure. Your pet's temperature, oxygen saturation level, heart rate and other vital signs are monitored from the time your pet is anesthetized until they are awake.

How Is My Pet's Pain Addressed?

Providing whatever pain relief is appropriate is the humane and caring thing to do for your pet. Recent advances in pain medications have allowed for better and safer pain control than ever before. After surgery, oral pain medication is provided to all patients based on appropriate level of need. Pets may not show the same symptoms of pain as people do; they often don't whine or cry, but that doesn't mean that they are not feeling pain. Pain medications dispensed will depend on the surgery performed. However, we always make every effort to take each individual animal's pain tolerance into consideration when prescribing the type and duration of pain control. Animals receive pain medication prior to surgical onset to help prevent pain before it even starts.

What About Post Surgical Care?

When you pick up your pet after surgery, plan to spend about 15 minutes with one of our technicians or assistants. They will answer any questions you have and go over your pet's home care needs such as feeding instructions, medications and any activity restrictions. Many surgeries require skin stitches. If there are pink skin sutures, these will usually be removed 10 to 14 days after surgery. Some surgeries use absorbable sutures in, or underneath, the skin. These will dissolve and do not need to be removed. With either type of suture, you need to watch the incision for swelling or discharge as well as monitor whether the pet is licking or chewing at the incision. In some cases we send your pet home with a bodyguard collar that he/she wears around the neck. We ask that you keep your pet calm and quiet for 7-14 days post op depending on the procedures. We want to make sure the tissue has time to heal and no damage to the area takes place.

New patients receive 15% OFF first visit.

Have Questions? Contact Us!


Location

Office Hours

Monday:

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Saturday:

7:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed